Free-Flow

January 31, 2021

We left our last article with some thoughts about digital recording, and how the sound quality is poor. In spite of this, I have a Spotify account where I have quite a play list consisting of just under 4,000 songs. When I was a kid, in order to obtain that same amount of music, I had an enormous collection of LP (Long Play) vinyl albums numbering in the thousands. Yes, storage was a bit of an issue, and it had the benefit of allowing me to find absolute gems on the album’s “2” side, instead of just the “top 10 hits” on side “1”.

Everyone enjoys music to whatever degree; my father was a bit odd in that way. His music tastes were very narrow, Fats Domino, Elvis Presley, Sinatra, the folk rock sound of America, and their song,” The Horse with No Name”. He dabbled with the hard rock sound of The James Gang, but beyond that, there was only the sound of silence around him. My mother’s tastes were a little broader consisting of Tom Jones, Charlie Pride, Freddie Fender, Meatloaf, The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac.  You may be wondering what if anything all this has to do with the Grail, be patient you will understand soon. When I was nine, I was beginning to search for my own musical tastes, I had found that I just did not like what my parents listened to, it was then on an early Saturday morning that I had got up early and was poking through my  brother’s album collection; where I discovered Led Zeppelin’s unnamed Zeppelin IV.

The album begins with a song about a black dog. Then has two songs loosely based on Tolkein’s Lord of the Rings.

It was, quite literally music to my ears and paved the way for the next 44 years of needing hard classic rock in my life. In previous articles, I have talked about the violence that was all too common in my parent’s home. I will not reiterate that now but music provided an escape for me, a coping mechanism. After school or work, I would clamp the headphones over my ears and loose myself in the sound, searching endlessly for meaning in the lyrics of the songs. Indeed sometimes, the song’s lyrics were It was, quite literally music to my ears and paved the way for the next 44 years of needing hard classic rock in my life. In previous articles, I have talked about the violence that was all too common in my parent’s home. I will not reiterate that now but music provided an escape for me, a coping mechanism. After school or work, I would clamp the headphones over my ears and loose myself in the sound, searching endlessly for meaning in the lyrics of the songs. Indeed sometimes, the song’s lyrics were perfect for whatever the circumstance or the meaning of the song needed just a little tweaking. Then there is the experience of actually seeing the band live, and feeling thousands of people around you all sharing their energy in the same place. Every now and again, an artist will comment on that, the energy. Sadly, too often, it feeds nothing but their egos; here we are talking about something very different.

Here now in the Kali Yuga, we have drifted a long way from the spiritual purity of Satya Yuga, or even the more moderate Treta Yuga, during these previous time periods our focus was on our higher light beings, our sacred selves. Then as now, we are warned to avoid distractions in our corporeal lives. We are warned in particular about sex, although it is hard to find anything wrong with sex between consenting adults. The problems arise when individuals become addicted to it, and the welfare of anyone involved becomes meaningless.

So sure sex is a great way to increase yours, and your partner’s vibratory energy, the merging of your auras. Music too has a similar effect. Some people become emotional when listening to loud music, or spiritual music, be that gospel or songs that have particular meanings to the individual. I enjoy the Blues because the song “Empty Rooms” by Gary Moore says exactly how I feel. It talks about pain that I cannot live with and a woman who I cannot live without. Yes, that would be the Nanny.

Adrian Wagner has done an incredible job of bringing the sound of the Grail to life matching frequencies and vibration, as you have never heard before.

I had the opportunity to communicate with Adrian back in the early aughts, I found him to be unpleasant and, less than helpful when answering questions that had anything to do with the Grail. I found his attitude to be very dismissive. In fact, I would go so far as to call him an ass.

It is with sadness that we note the passing of British electronic composer, entrepreneur and inventor Adrian Wagner, who co-created the Wasp synthesizer. The great-great-grandson of German composer Richard Wagner, Adrian wrote and released many musical works of his own, collaborated with the Radiophonic Workshop and even penned the theme tune to the Trans World Sport television show. However, it was the low-cost yellow and black synthesizer, developed with synth designer Chris Huggett (of Oscar and Novation fame) that really cements his name in the music production hall of fame. 

In an age of VCOs, the Wasp’s inventive DCOs kept their tuning remarkably well, and its use of capacitive keyboard strips rather than a regular keyboard was quite unusual. Its key selling point was the price, though. At only £200 upon its release in 1977, it was substantially less than anything from Moog, Oberheim, or Roland. Wagner went on to produce entomologically themed devices such as the Gnat single-voice synth, Spider sequencer, the Caterpillar keyboard, the Wasp Deluxe and more.

After leaving the world of synth making, Wagner moved to Wales and continued to release music on his Mediaquest label, and pursued his other passions of photography and painting.

His contribution to the world of electronic music cannot be underestimated — conceiving of and bringing to market, a synthesizer that was truly affordable was no mean feat. Also, the gritty, dirty sounds of which it was capable made it a go-to for those eschewing the prog-rock aesthetic of the late ‘70s, gaining notable users over the years such as Vince Clarke, Chris Carter of Throbbing Gristle, 808 State, Will Gregory and more.

Adrian passed away on June 22, 2018. His wife Helen and stepchildren Stephen and Emma survive him.

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